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Shelton Mason County Journal
Shelton, Washington
January 4, 2007     Shelton Mason County Journal
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January 4, 2007
 

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Harstine Island: Ripple effects seen in storm aftermath Seeley is hospital's Employee of Month By JOHN COOPER Many years ago a popular song had the title, "The Song Is Ended But the Melody Lingers On." A rephrasing of the title might de- scribe conditions today: "Decem- ber's Storm Is Ended But the Mal- ady Lingers On." A few days ago while lunching at Spencer Lake Resort we were looking out at the ever pleasing vista of Spencer Lake itself. Sud- denly, down along the shoreline a large tree toppled and crashed to the ground. It was a reminder that trees loosened by the high winds last month will continue to fall or will have to be felled for safety reasons. Last Thursday, about 10 p.m. the lights flickered and power was cut off, leaving us unsettled in the dark. Fortunately the outage lasted for only 30 minutes and not the four days without electricity which was our lot in mid-Decem- ber. It was a reminder. We checked our files to see what happened in the winter of 2006 and discovered that in late Febru- ary and early March we were writ- ing about severe storm damage. In fact, we reported that a large tree fell between Jim Anderson's home and the dwelling of John Petit on Chesapeake Drive. The fallen giant clipped the corner of Petit's house, buckled his deck and smashed his picnic table. It is a reminder that there is still a lot of wintertime ahead of us. And the days, some of them, may be stormy. IN A SUMMARY of the mid- December storm of 2006 Jan Av- ery, security office, reported that at least 30 trees fell at Hartstene Pointe during the strong wind- storm of December 14. As we talked, a resident arrived to say that another large tree was down in front of his house. e said that, remarkably, in crashing down it completely missing his dwelling. Such near misses were reported in a number of cases. One per- son who has been involved in the cleanup described them as "amaz- ing examples of a wonderful cho- reography." Other houses did not fare as well. Nineteen homes at the Pointe had trees crash down on them that did minimal to seri- ous damage. One automobile was demolished and another car had its rear window smashed. The fence around the perimeter of the Pointe, the fences around the swimming pool, and the tennis courts were destroyed in various spots and will need repair. The most severely damaged home at the Pointe was the resi- dence of Tom McEvoy at 439 Pointes Drive East. A large tree crashed down and literally cut the house in two. It penetrated through the ceiling over a central hallway. No one inside the dwell- ing was injured. Five McEvoy children, ages 7 through 14, were sleeping in bedrooms to one side of the hallway into which the fallen tree intruded. They were shaken but untouched, truly spared by an- other "wonderful choreography." We have had a visit from a larg- er than usual contingent of spot- ted towhees visiting our deck as they forage for food. Six or seven plump specimens of this big, col- orful sparrow have ventured up to heights 10 to 15 feet above the level of the scrub where they are often heard but not seen. AT FIRST GLANCE, those birds can be mistakenly thought to be robins. Towhees are a little smaller, averaging about nine inches tip of beak to tip of tail when grown while the robin ma- tures to about 11 inches. Robins are fully red-breasted while the towhees' reddish flanks give way to the white of its breast. Its black back and wings are spotted with white. This welcome little flock has thoroughly scratched, pecked and p,[ .... p 100 Years Ago From the January 4, 1907, Mason County Journal: The football Tuesday bhtween the Olympia High school second team, re- sulted in the victory of the former by a score of 4 to 0. The game consisted of one 25 minute half, in which no score was made, most of the playing being in Olympia's territory; but in the last half the visitors scored their points in a lively scrimmage of twenty minutes. Gilbert was the local star while all the locals played their positions quite well, considering the little practice. J.E. Connolly will soon make im- portant additions to his ice and cold- storage plant, by installing a gasolene engine for emergency power and also a new compressor and large ice vat, which will double the capacity.of the plant, as well as providing recourse in case of break-down of the new plant. 35 Years Ago From the January 6, 1972, Shelton- Mason County Journal: Shelton Postmaster Frank McGuire is retiring Friday after more than 35 years with the U.S. Post Office. The Plan of Progress (POP) group will hold a meeting at 7:30 p.m. Mon- day in the PUD 3 Conference Room. The meeting will be to discuss the wa- ter, sewer and garbage situations in the city and the Shelton Creek Flood Control and Drainage Project, which the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is working on, according to POP Chair- man Clint Willour. 10 Years Ago From the January 2, 1997, Shelton- Mason County Journal: A four-day snow and ice storm landed repeated blows on Mason County last week, knocking out power to nearly everyone, dropping trees on roads and houses and making driving treacherous. A North Shore resident, Arthur B. McKaig, 73, died last Friday afternoon at his home at 4993 North Shore Road after being hit by a falling tree branch during the ice storm. Murder charges have been filed in Mason County Superior Court against one of the individuals earlier called a "person of interest" in the No- vember death of 18-year-old Dayton resident Gerald Harkins. Roy James Townsend, 26, who has been incarcer- ated in a Yakima jail in an unrelated criminal matter, is charged with first- degree murder. Adults who read can get getaway (Continued from page 18.) a deluxe room and gourmet breakfast for two at the Shel- burne Inn in Seaview; two nights for two at the Charles Nelson Guest House in Ocean Park; one night and breakfast in bed fbr two in the Governor Suite of the Phoenix Inn in Olympia; one night for two at the Ocean Crest Resort at Sunset Beach in Mo- clips; and one night for two at the Lake Quinault Lodge in the Olympic National Forest. The other grand prizes are 10 baskets, each containing a book, an audio book, travel mug, tea, coffee and a book store gift card. Page 24 - Shelton-Mason County Journal - Thursday, January 4, 2007 rummaged through the flower boxes on the deck railing, finding tidbits that appeal to birds. We observed one plump fellow happi- ly hopping through potted plants that had been pulled back under the eaves close by our window, which made it possible to see this fellow very closely. It was amazing to see the number of edible items the towhee was able to discover. They even flew up to hanging feeders. Holding on awkwardly and with wings aflutter they hang on long enough to get a beakful of suet, a sunflower seed or two, or a puzzling peanut in its shell. The birds provided enjoyable inter- ludes between showers. Welcome to January and the new year of 2007. There was some- thing special to celebrate back in 1863 on the first day of the year. On January 1, 1863 Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. FARTHER BACK, in ancient Roman times, January 1 wasn't New Year's Day. In fact January and February weren't in the old, old calendar. Winter was consid- ered a monthless period. Fortu- nately, the calendar was improved in 153 B.C. A number of things happened for the first time in Januarys of years gone by. The first presiden- tial election was held in 1789; gold was first discovered in California in 1848; the first great oil discov- ery took place in Texas in 1901 and the first atomic submarine, SSN Nautilus was launched in 1954. Bringing things up-to-date, we learned on January 1, 2007 that 92 toe-tapping feet belonging to 46 individuals danced the hours away from 9 p.m. to midnight at the community club-spons0red dinner-dance held December 31 at the Harstine Island Community Hall. "Previously live music" was pro- vided {'or the dancers by D.J.s Rod Hammett and John Strasberger, who learned that the melodies played by the big bands and the rhythms of rock 'n' roll were the most enjoyed. A BUFFET DINNER was pro- vided by the crew of the LaJune Senior Lunch and a number of their spouses. A good time was had by all as they welcomed the new year. The Harstine Island Communi- ty Club will meet on Friday, Janu- ary 12, at the communit..hall. Of- ricers who will managie iaffairs of the club in 2007 will be elected. They will have important matters to resolve and, we feel sure, will appreciate a vote of affirmation. The program for the" evening will be a talk by Don Winter, the new superintendent of the Pioneer School District. Mr. Winter will speak of the coming school year at the Pioneer School,. educational needs, community involvement and the goals that he will pursue as superintendent. With the ever- increasing number of students from Harstine Island attending Pioneer, this presentation should interest many islanders. The sewing group will meet at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, January 16, at the home of Marlene Echaniz. Carol Seeley was recently selected by her peers to be Employee of the Month for December at Mason General Hospi- tal. Seeley is a registered nurse and has been employed at the hospital since Au- gust 2005. However, her story is quite unique. "I took 30 years off after high school to raise my family," she said. She went to South Puget Sound Com- munity College and became a nurse, graduating in June of 2005. "It was an opportunity that came my way," she said. "I feel so blessed to have been able to go back to school." "She is such a sweetheart to work with," said her supervisor, Kathy Gro- ver, a registered nurse. Seeley said she enjoys the patient con- tact she has, especially with the patients and family members who need reassur- ance during stressful and doubtful times. Carol Seeley When she is not working, Seeley loves to build things and work in her greenhouse and chicken coop. "I love caring for things," she said. rmed robbery c .00.arged in case in,00olving brush (Continued from page 18.) Ford pickup truck and one of the men slashed all four tires on the minivan Santiago and his broth- er were using. The Santiago brothers were able to provide a description of the men and the truck .they were in and deputies relayed this in- formation to local brush sheds. At about 2:40 p.m. an employ- ee at Ted's Shed said two males matching the description from the sheriffs office had dropped off a load of "sweet huck." Nico- las Santiago reportedly identi- fied both men as the robbers and said Green held the shotgun. AFTER THE MEN were ar- rested, Kramer allegedly said Green picked him up and they were going to cut firewood, but found Mateo Santiago cutting "sweet huck" and they accused him of being on private land. Kramer claimed Mateo Santia- go slapped him with a bunch of huck he was holding in his hand and then pushed him. Kramer said Green was standing by the truck with a shotgun cradled his arms. Kramer reportedly said l and Green had taken, brush froI Hispanics before because the felt they had a right to take th brush from the Hispanics. Kran er also reportedly said Green toc a sledgehammer and flattene the tires on the minivan. Greel allegedly said Kramer never ha, a shotgun and that it was hi shotgun. He said he would nq let Kramer touch the gun sine he was a convicted felon. Green and Kramer are cused of stealing 175 bunches huckleberry valued at 65 cenl per bunch for a total of $113.75 Tip line can alert to potential violence A toll-free number at the She ton Police Department lets peep report school violence, or threai of violence, to police without bei identified. The number is 1-877 79-SAFE. :i Keep the home fires burning with a gas or woodstove or insert by FIREPLACE PRODUCTS Even with the power out... you stay warm! Don't let the next bout of bad weather catch you without heat! 90 Days Same As Cash Capital City Stove & Fan Center 2118 Pacific Ave., Olympia 943-5587 Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday I0 a.m.-2 p.m. Harstine Island: Ripple effects seen in storm aftermath Seeley is hospital's Employee of Month By JOHN COOPER Many years ago a popular song had the title, "The Song Is Ended But the Melody Lingers On." A rephrasing of the title might de- scribe conditions today: "Decem- ber's Storm Is Ended But the Mal- ady Lingers On." A few days ago while lunching at Spencer Lake Resort we were looking out at the ever pleasing vista of Spencer Lake itself. Sud- denly, down along the shoreline a large tree toppled and crashed to the ground. It was a reminder that trees loosened by the high winds last month will continue to fall or will have to be felled for safety reasons. Last Thursday, about 10 p.m. the lights flickered and power was cut off, leaving us unsettled in the dark. Fortunately the outage lasted for only 30 minutes and not the four days without electricity which was our lot in mid-Decem- ber. It was a reminder. We checked our files to see what happened in the winter of 2006 and discovered that in late Febru- ary and early March we were writ- ing about severe storm damage. In fact, we reported that a large tree fell between Jim Anderson's home and the dwelling of John Petit on Chesapeake Drive. The fallen giant clipped the corner of Petit's house, buckled his deck and smashed his picnic table. It is a reminder that there is still a lot of wintertime ahead of us. And the days, some of them, may be stormy. IN A SUMMARY of the mid- December storm of 2006 Jan Av- ery, security office, reported that at least 30 trees fell at Hartstene Pointe during the strong wind- storm of December 14. As we talked, a resident arrived to say that another large tree was down in front of his house. e said that, remarkably, in crashing down it completely missing his dwelling. Such near misses were reported in a number of cases. One per- son who has been involved in the cleanup described them as "amaz- ing examples of a wonderful cho- reography." Other houses did not fare as well. Nineteen homes at the Pointe had trees crash down on them that did minimal to seri- ous damage. One automobile was demolished and another car had its rear window smashed. The fence around the perimeter of the Pointe, the fences around the swimming pool, and the tennis courts were destroyed in various spots and will need repair. The most severely damaged home at the Pointe was the resi- dence of Tom McEvoy at 439 Pointes Drive East. A large tree crashed down and literally cut the house in two. It penetrated through the ceiling over a central hallway. No one inside the dwell- ing was injured. Five McEvoy children, ages 7 through 14, were sleeping in bedrooms to one side of the hallway into which the fallen tree intruded. They were shaken but untouched, truly spared by an- other "wonderful choreography." We have had a visit from a larg- er than usual contingent of spot- ted towhees visiting our deck as they forage for food. Six or seven plump specimens of this big, col- orful sparrow have ventured up to heights 10 to 15 feet above the level of the scrub where they are often heard but not seen. AT FIRST GLANCE, those birds can be mistakenly thought to be robins. Towhees are a little smaller, averaging about nine inches tip of beak to tip of tail when grown while the robin ma- tures to about 11 inches. Robins are fully red-breasted while the towhees' reddish flanks give way to the white of its breast. Its black back and wings are spotted with white. This welcome little flock has thoroughly scratched, pecked and p,[ .... p 100 Years Ago From the January 4, 1907, Mason County Journal: The football Tuesday bhtween the Olympia High school second team, re- sulted in the victory of the former by a score of 4 to 0. The game consisted of one 25 minute half, in which no score was made, most of the playing being in Olympia's territory; but in the last half the visitors scored their points in a lively scrimmage of twenty minutes. Gilbert was the local star while all the locals played their positions quite well, considering the little practice. J.E. Connolly will soon make im- portant additions to his ice and cold- storage plant, by installing a gasolene engine for emergency power and also a new compressor and large ice vat, which will double the capacity.of the plant, as well as providing recourse in case of break-down of the new plant. 35 Years Ago From the January 6, 1972, Shelton- Mason County Journal: Shelton Postmaster Frank McGuire is retiring Friday after more than 35 years with the U.S. Post Office. The Plan of Progress (POP) group will hold a meeting at 7:30 p.m. Mon- day in the PUD 3 Conference Room. The meeting will be to discuss the wa- ter, sewer and garbage situations in the city and the Shelton Creek Flood Control and Drainage Project, which the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is working on, according to POP Chair- man Clint Willour. 10 Years Ago From the January 2, 1997, Shelton- Mason County Journal: A four-day snow and ice storm landed repeated blows on Mason County last week, knocking out power to nearly everyone, dropping trees on roads and houses and making driving treacherous. A North Shore resident, Arthur B. McKaig, 73, died last Friday afternoon at his home at 4993 North Shore Road after being hit by a falling tree branch during the ice storm. Murder charges have been filed in Mason County Superior Court against one of the individuals earlier called a "person of interest" in the No- vember death of 18-year-old Dayton resident Gerald Harkins. Roy James Townsend, 26, who has been incarcer- ated in a Yakima jail in an unrelated criminal matter, is charged with first- degree murder. Adults who read can get getaway (Continued from page 18.) a deluxe room and gourmet breakfast for two at the Shel- burne Inn in Seaview; two nights for two at the Charles Nelson Guest House in Ocean Park; one night and breakfast in bed fbr two in the Governor Suite of the Phoenix Inn in Olympia; one night for two at the Ocean Crest Resort at Sunset Beach in Mo- clips; and one night for two at the Lake Quinault Lodge in the Olympic National Forest. The other grand prizes are 10 baskets, each containing a book, an audio book, travel mug, tea, coffee and a book store gift card. Page 24 - Shelton-Mason County Journal - Thursday, January 4, 2007 rummaged through the flower boxes on the deck railing, finding tidbits that appeal to birds. We observed one plump fellow happi- ly hopping through potted plants that had been pulled back under the eaves close by our window, which made it possible to see this fellow very closely. It was amazing to see the number of edible items the towhee was able to discover. They even flew up to hanging feeders. Holding on awkwardly and with wings aflutter they hang on long enough to get a beakful of suet, a sunflower seed or two, or a puzzling peanut in its shell. The birds provided enjoyable inter- ludes between showers. Welcome to January and the new year of 2007. There was some- thing special to celebrate back in 1863 on the first day of the year. On January 1, 1863 Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation. FARTHER BACK, in ancient Roman times, January 1 wasn't New Year's Day. In fact January and February weren't in the old, old calendar. Winter was consid- ered a monthless period. Fortu- nately, the calendar was improved in 153 B.C. A number of things happened for the first time in Januarys of years gone by. The first presiden- tial election was held in 1789; gold was first discovered in California in 1848; the first great oil discov- ery took place in Texas in 1901 and the first atomic submarine, SSN Nautilus was launched in 1954. Bringing things up-to-date, we learned on January 1, 2007 that 92 toe-tapping feet belonging to 46 individuals danced the hours away from 9 p.m. to midnight at the community club-spons0red dinner-dance held December 31 at the Harstine Island Community Hall. "Previously live music" was pro- vided {'or the dancers by D.J.s Rod Hammett and John Strasberger, who learned that the melodies played by the big bands and the rhythms of rock 'n' roll were the most enjoyed. A BUFFET DINNER was pro- vided by the crew of the LaJune Senior Lunch and a number of their spouses. A good time was had by all as they welcomed the new year. The Harstine Island Communi- ty Club will meet on Friday, Janu- ary 12, at the communit..hall. Of- ricers who will managie iaffairs of the club in 2007 will be elected. They will have important matters to resolve and, we feel sure, will appreciate a vote of affirmation. The program for the" evening will be a talk by Don Winter, the new superintendent of the Pioneer School District. Mr. Winter will speak of the coming school year at the Pioneer School,. educational needs, community involvement and the goals that he will pursue as superintendent. With the ever- increasing number of students from Harstine Island attending Pioneer, this presentation should interest many islanders. The sewing group will meet at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, January 16, at the home of Marlene Echaniz. Carol Seeley was recently selected by her peers to be Employee of the Month for December at Mason General Hospi- tal. Seeley is a registered nurse and has been employed at the hospital since Au- gust 2005. However, her story is quite unique. "I took 30 years off after high school to raise my family," she said. She went to South Puget Sound Com- munity College and became a nurse, graduating in June of 2005. "It was an opportunity that came my way," she said. "I feel so blessed to have been able to go back to school." "She is such a sweetheart to work with," said her supervisor, Kathy Gro- ver, a registered nurse. Seeley said she enjoys the patient con- tact she has, especially with the patients and family members who need reassur- ance during stressful and doubtful times. Carol Seeley When she is not working, Seeley loves to build things and work in her greenhouse and chicken coop. "I love caring for things," she said. rmed robbery c .00.arged in case in,00olving brush (Continued from page 18.) Ford pickup truck and one of the men slashed all four tires on the minivan Santiago and his broth- er were using. The Santiago brothers were able to provide a description of the men and the truck .they were in and deputies relayed this in- formation to local brush sheds. At about 2:40 p.m. an employ- ee at Ted's Shed said two males matching the description from the sheriffs office had dropped off a load of "sweet huck." Nico- las Santiago reportedly identi- fied both men as the robbers and said Green held the shotgun. AFTER THE MEN were ar- rested, Kramer allegedly said Green picked him up and they were going to cut firewood, but found Mateo Santiago cutting "sweet huck" and they accused him of being on private land. Kramer claimed Mateo Santia- go slapped him with a bunch of huck he was holding in his hand and then pushed him. Kramer said Green was standing by the truck with a shotgun cradled his arms. Kramer reportedly said l and Green had taken, brush froI Hispanics before because the felt they had a right to take th brush from the Hispanics. Kran er also reportedly said Green toc a sledgehammer and flattene the tires on the minivan. Greel allegedly said Kramer never ha, a shotgun and that it was hi shotgun. He said he would nq let Kramer touch the gun sine he was a convicted felon. Green and Kramer are cused of stealing 175 bunches huckleberry valued at 65 cenl per bunch for a total of $113.75 Tip line can alert to potential violence A toll-free number at the She ton Police Department lets peep report school violence, or threai of violence, to police without bei identified. The number is 1-877 79-SAFE. :i Keep the home fires burning with a gas or woodstove or insert by FIREPLACE PRODUCTS Even with the power out... you stay warm! Don't let the next bout of bad weather catch you without heat! 90 Days Same As Cash Capital City Stove & Fan Center 2118 Pacific Ave., Olympia 943-5587 Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday I0 a.m.-2 p.m.