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Shelton Mason County Journal
Shelton, Washington
Mason County Journal
News of Mason County, WA
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May 9, 1963     Shelton Mason County Journal
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May 9, 1963
 

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i LETTERS i + To The Editor AFTER 2 %VINTERS IN BRITISH COLUMBIA WILDS Tatha Lake B. C. April 22, 1963 Dear Bill, Would you be interested in a report of what it is like to live in wild Chilcotin area of British Columbia? The Chilcotin and the Criboo districts are the last of the "untamed" portion of B.C. We have spent two winters here and find that each was different. I have since learned that no two Winters are alike. I can understand now why it was so difficult to get an answer to our queries from the natives. It makes things more in- teresting to have the climate like this. We have sunshine all winter long, This is something that amaz- es me. after living in Shelton for 25 years. I had come to expect rain as a matter of course for winter. We live in a log house in a small valley. On two sides huge moun- tains tower above, covered perpet- ually with snow. At the south end of the valley lies a large lake-- Tatlayoko Lake--- full of trout. To the North is the only road into the valley. APPRECIATION EXPRESSED THE FACE OF NIUT is carved Editor: in stone on top of one of the moan- The Journal: tains. Niut was an old Indian wo- We'd like to express our heart- man of long ago. It was she who felt thanks and appreciation for strewed and planted the wild po- the assistance given us by the tatoes on top of all the mountains many. people of Mason County and to the south of us. According to members of the Sheriff's Depart- legend, she died here, and is buried ment who came out in force to where her face is. Strangely, there help in the search for our two- are no wild potatoes growingany year-old son, Ivan, when he was further north. The Indians consi- lost in the woods. Also. special der them, a great delicacy. The po- thanks to Ed Pialand for the many tatoes are about the size of small services he provided, Harold marbles, but very tasty. The In-lBrown ' and the Cornucopia 4-H dians go every summer and gath-I club members who were the first r them by the sacks full, They I one s to join in the search. We're re hard to clea but that doesn't ! grateful to those who donated food bother the Indians. They eat dirt l for the searchers and to those and all. The children love the winter sports. They each have learned to ice skate and ski. Jimmy plays on the school hockey team. Some days the children put thew skates on at home and skate all the way to school. That is when the ground is covered with ice so slippery it is impossible to stand up. On those days I stay quietly by the fire. .During the winter the silence I of our noisy, chatterhg river is I strange. The voic of Crazy Creek, ] that loud, boisterous stream that I comes bounding and rolling down] the mountains from a glacler, is also stilled. During the summer and autumn the sound of the gush- ing stream can be heard for a half 1 mite thtlndering over its rocky i falls. The roads in the Chilcotin are the kind the States had 40 years e4o, ,They arc not too bad dur- ing the summer, fall, and winter; but during the spring thaw, we have MUD. Then we all stay at home until the spring winds and sunshine have dried the roads. IT W'AS INTERESTING to me to read in the Journal about the snow depths above Hoodsport. :Here are a few statistics of our snow depths. In March. when the reading was taken of Potato :lt., altitude of 5600 ft., the snow was 41.1 inches deep. The waet- con- tent was 14.25. The deepest it has been was 13 years ago when The snow was 63 inches deep. The low- est depth was in 1960 when it was 28.8 inches. This is a hunter's and a fisher- man's paradise. There are so many lakes and streams--all full of trout. Right in front of our log house last summer we caught 260 re-out in six weeks time. They are delicious coming from these icy streams. The deer and moose are plenti- ful too. My hnsband has counted herds with as many as 50 deer in a herd down the valley. They are jltsL bounding everywhere. The moose come down from the high country and spend the win. ter in the valley. It is nothing to see moose ambling along the road. Two moose have spent the winter across the river in a swampy part Of our lend. We have 160 acres, and :deer and moose signs are ev- erywhere. The timber does not get as large up here as it does in Washing- ton, but we have virgin timber here. Our log house is built from our own timber. We have put up a oe room log cabin too, which is for rent to hunters. LAST FALL we had over a thousand pounds of meal moose and deer--hanging m otu- :ue+t house. Each hunter is allowe(l three deer apiece, and one moose. We invite you all to come up and see this wild, wonderful coun- try. All along the way are the nicest camping spots water and trees and privacy--all free. We enjoy reading the Journal. ] I never realized how much I mis- sed it, until I started getting it again. I especially enjoy the re- cipes. We want to thank Boney Loertscher for his sour dough re- cipes. We made a starter sponge and have had some dellcmus bis- cuits and pancakes. I'm going to try some cinnamon rolls and bread from the sponge, too. I also want to thank the woman who put in the recipe for the Red Velvet cake. As long as I lived in Shelton. I never could get any- one to give me that recipe. But thanks to the Journal, I now have it. We miss our friends in Shelton, but are as happy and contented as larks otherwise. Best regards to you all. Very truly, Barney & Jeanne Combs who helped sel-ce it. Space won't pernlit naming everyone, but all who helped that night we do thank from the bottom of our hearts. We're grateful to God that strang- ers, as well as friends would come to our aid in such an emergency, with labor and with prayers. Thank you: Mr. & Mrs. Leroy Dishon, 3r. Star Route 1. Box 180, Allyn, Washington. Itemized I.eme Tax Deducation tlvrage $1,420 In ,County NEW YORK, (Special.l--How do income tax deductions claimed by Mason County residents com- pare with the amounts claimed by taxpayers in other areas? How closely will retmms be [ scanned this year for excessive de- ductions? More closely than be- fore. according to information trickling out of the Treasury De- partment, Up-to-date electronic computers and a larger staff of examiners will make it possible. With aPloximatelv 25 nillion taxpayers itemizing l.heir deduc- tions, the Government has c.m- piled tables to show the avorage amounts that are claimed in eeh income bracket. When a normal amount is listed in a return, the chances are that it will go through without being questioned. However, when it is higher than usual for a particu- lar income, it is likely to be caught by the gimlet eye of an exammer. In that case, the entire report may be set aside for a thorough review and the taxpayer called to support his claims with proper records. What are these critical amounts that may not be exceeded with impunity? The totals, as they concern Mason County and other communities, arc detailed by the Commerce Clearing House. which reports on matters of tax mid business law. Its figures are based on Treasury Department findings. For the average Mason County family, whose gross income is ap- proximately $7,434 a year, ac- cording to the most recent data, the deductions should not be more than $1,420 to conform to the na- tional. Making up this amount are con- tributions, $244, interest charges, $452, tax payments, $429, and medical costs. $291. USED eARS 1958 PLYMOUTH CLUB SEDAN ...... s795 Radio, Heater, Push-buton trans. t957 FORD STATION WAGON .......... =795 Radio Heater, Automatic 1955 MERCURY 0-pass. wagon ............ S595 t, Radio, Heater, Automatic- Real Clean! 1954 FORD STA. WAGON .................... s445 New Engine 1953 CHEVROLET 4-door .................. '345 J $100 SPECIALS They Run Good 1952 BUICK Std. trans. 1952 DODGE Std. trans. GET A '63 DODGE They're Dependable! Guaranteed for 50,000 Miles or 5 Years!! PAULEY IIOTORS SHELTON--MASON COUNTY JOURNAl5- Publishecl in "Chrisfmastown, U.Z.A.", Shelton, Washington Timber Losses From insect Damage Death stalks American forests, species of lumber and shade trees Quietly, methodically some seven mlion board feet of lumber trees chewed, bo:ed, sucked, and bit- to death each year. Over three u:  - "+esidences worth of stand- g ::, s destroyed annually :y I-:72" a :!: dise3,ses, !- ............. e American chest- U :' Nf ::. people do because Ihi; . .r,, ,: i:y giant, father of a +hrivi =-+'- r ",fiture industry, isall but extiuet now due to ravages of a blight The ' are threatened by death and injury from insects and diseases. THE TREE LOS picture is made all the more serious by our wood demand situation. Did you know that this year, every American will use 80 cubic feet of wood --- in telephone poles, paper prducts, furniture railroad ties, fence posts, and a thousand other uses? What you probably don't know High that's only a part of tree damage and destruction --- about 25 pc., cent of the losses which are caused by insects and diseases.) , Actually, the fight to save tim- ber and shade trees has been going on for a long time, Now, with the recent development of more effec- tive pesticide chemicals, our de- fensive measures are beginning to pay off. THE JOB IS A_ TOUGH one. For is that by the turn of one thing, there are som 664 mil- the century our wood use will be lion acres of forest land in the up to 133 cubic feet a year per United States. much of it inacces- Ibird. resources for controlling outbreaks are efficient but our money i: lilnited. Pe'ticides will probably do more than any oLtmr agent to control :liscae and insect outbreaks. The National Academy of Sciences. for example, concludes that pesticides are the only effective method of fighting epidemics under certain conditions. Printing Quality Work of All Kinds Thursda LOW COST HOllE NEW CONSTRUCTION -- REMOI), PURCHASE i ; 6% On Reducing Balances -- No Co Charges Mason Gounly Savings & Loan TITLE INSURANCE BUILDING beautiful American elm I threatens to go the way of the [ person, sibe for treatment at the present THE JOURNAL SHELTON ,:, chestnut through a disease v2hich 227 Cota Phone 426-4412 The answer is obvious: m some tin]e. For another, closely "pack- even now is spreading westward, way we will have to cut insect an ed" trees make for ideal conditions _.:: Pines, spruces, offs ._..some 1,007 disease losses in our forests. (Fired of diseas THE-B|0000ERiTHIN6 1'0 'M00M OPii "HER i00A,I GUT-UP & PAN READY sUJI nil/5 Strawberries .5 =i VEGETABLES..o VarietiesASsrtedFrzen 7 10 oz. Pkgs. GRAPE JUICE 6 +1 POTATO CHIPS 49' DOG FOOD Pard, Your Dog Will Love Pard! CHUNK TUNA Star Kist PEANUT BUTTER su..y J,n. .............................................................................................. ,s o. Jar 49 PREM LUNOH MEAT B Sw.t ........................................................................................ ,, oz. T,. 39 + ZEE PAPER TOWELS 5o shee,Ro,, 19 CHEERIOS - KIX TRIX - WHEATIES 3 Pkg. 89 _ -_ - JEWEL OIL PET MILK Farln 3 1 Fresh Washing- ton Grown, Lb. U.S. CHOICE 1963 SPRING LAMB SALE.," LEG O" LAMB U.. "CHOICE GENUINE SPRING LAMB, LAMB ROAST RIB CHOPS PRE-CARVED U.S. "CHOICE" SPRING LAMB U.S. "CHOICE" SHORT CUT LAMB CHOPS ............ LB. LOIN CHOPS U.S. "CHOICE" SPRING LAMB LAHB RIBLETS , LAMB ............................................. ..- WOW... A TERRIFI,C SHOP,RITE VALUE 3 LB. TIN SHASTA ORANGE OR GRAPE 5 "FRESH AS A DAISY" PRODUCE GRAPEFRUIT ARIZONA WHITES 46-oz. Tins LB. 5 BAG Ry Crisp Stalks 15 LOCAL RHUBARB ONIONS Yellow Calif. .................................................................... 20 Lb. Box SWIFT'S MARGARINE, TOPS IN QUALITY POUNDS MJB COFFEE ........ .OOND T,N 59 ............................  L. ' CHIFFON FACIAL TISSUES W.ITE, a ,",ii: ASSORTED ........................ Ir ELBOW MAGAROHi M,ssIoN ;'i ........................................................................ .24 oz, PUG' GOLD MEDAL FLOUR .................................................................... 25 TiNY SHRIMP PAC,FIC PEARL ........................................................................................ 4Vz oz. TALL . 8/=1 TINS ........................................................ BUTTER ARDEN ................................ 1L, +! t# C' CAKE MIX p,l,sb,r, o. PINK 'N' PRETTY TEA REO ROSE SYRUP LUMBERJACK CRACKERS SUNSHINE Front St. & Railroad Ave. Phone 426-8183 Prices Effective May 9-10-11 Limit Rights Reserved