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Shelton Mason County Journal
Shelton, Washington
Mason County Journal
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September 19, 1963     Shelton Mason County Journal
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September 19, 1963
 

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PAGE 6 B | I n " POLICE COURT On the docket in Sheltou Police Court Monday night before Judge Rolls Halbert were Robert Die- merit, speeding, $10 fine and $4.50 costs; Christopher Sutherland, speeding, $12 forfeit; Arthur Tunt- land. no operator's license. $12 for- feit; Joseph Kilbourne. speeding, no operator's license. $17 forfeit; Mary E. Cook, dnmk in public, $25 forfeit; Raymond H. Horn, 234 So. 2nd Shelton, furnishing a min- or with beer, $50 forfeit: Gene C. Hoosier, minor in possession of liquor, $25 forfeit; Wayne D. Carlson. minor m possession of liquor, $25 forfeit; Howard Wil- son. drunk in public, $10 fine, $2.50 COSTS. SHERIFF'S O]FICE ARRESTS Booked at the Mason County Sheriff's office during the past week were Brian J. Heath. Taco- ma. parole violation; William Mul- ler, driving while intoxicated. BUILDING PERMITS Building permits approved by MARK E, REED From The County- City Records " (Continued horn page 1) nod . . . too many things to do. Mark Reed, head of many corpo- rations, who sat on many boards and carried the problems of a state always had time to stop and ask "bow's the family?" " . . . . many instances of the be- nevolence of Mark Reed, especi- ally to loggers. Loggers were his pride. It was for them he worked so hard to establish in Shelton the best hospital facilities then known in the state. And every day he personally attended to the busin- ess affairs of the hospital. He was the first man m the logging bum- ness to set up company paid in- surance for his men. "To this day. Simpson employes confined in the Shelton hospital receive free shaves and haircuts. Reed even had architectural plans drawn for a retirement home for his old loggers. It would have stood about where the Shelton- Bayshore golf clubhouse is today, The depression knocked this plan out. "Mark Reed continued to pay taxes on lands already logged in a day when most loggers fled from their stunlps and left the scarred earth a burden upon the county. 'We have taken the money off the land. It is not fair to drop it as a burden upon the county.' he said. "THE GREATEST depression ot the century had stricken the cola- try after the 1929 crash. Mark Reed. witll his powerful contacts in the banking world, had sensed the potential danger anxt put his inventories in shape to meet months of poor prices and thin markets. "Wages were being cut. Simpson had paid above average wages for years. Reed took pride in lead- ing the icld. But. now had come the final slHsh. Men in the mill were being paid 25 cents an hour. "You run the mill." Reed told Chris Kreienbaum in 1931. 'You keep the mill going and I'll prom- ise you no onc will starve in Shcl- ton'. "Nobody wanted lumber at any price because nobody had money. One morning Kreienbaum walked into Reed's office and said he had decided to close the mill because of the burden it had become on the company's resources. " 'I'd think about that tonight', he told Kris. 'You want to re- member this town depends upon this company. We could close ann survive but the town's merchants would go under. We encouraged people to come here when we built the mill. The merchants came here at our urging. If the men can't work and pay bills, the merchants won't be able to meet their obli- gations, the bank will have to close and we will set off a chain ot events that will be felt throughout the state. You think about it'. "Next day the mill kept l:un- ning. "ROOSEVELT'S election as pres- ident in 1932 ended years of Re- publican leadership which Mark Reed had provided through seven terms as Mason County represen- tative at Olympia and through mans years as National GOP co{=n- mittceman for this state. Three times he had declined to run for the governorship and once fbr U.S. Senator. positions he easily could have won in that period of Repub- lican power. "He was nanled a member of the national committee to draft a NationM Industrial Recovery Act code for the lumber industry. Vehatevec his private opinion of a government dedicated to regu- lation, he labored through the in- tense heat of an eastern summer, sometimes 20 hours at a sitting, and was one of five men who wrote a code acceptable to the Pre- sident. His forceful logic and per- sonality was credited with sav- ing the hotly-argued code from disaster. "In August, 1933. Mark Reed suddenly became ill along with other prominent business leader.,; Who had attcnded the Cllicago NR A nlcctings. On Sept. 5, 1933, alter a month-long strnggle for life. and following the desperation of row- gory, Mark Reed was dead. | I the Mason County Commission on Monday were to Donald R. Ander- son, wood residence, $5,000; Dr. Charles Evans, wood cabin, $1,000; Cllarles H. Villivock, bulkhead and breakwater, $300; Claude Mason, wood residence, $4,000; Richard Fulton, wood residence. $1.200 and Alphonse L. Muller, wood cabin. $500. SIPERIOR COURT New case.--Roy O. and Bernice Baughman have filed a suit for personal injuries against Louis Zehlberg and his wife. Estates filed for probate--John Bird and Glenn L. Pettyjohn. POLICE DEPARTMENT Police investigated after being informed that someone was trying to break into a car on the Kimbel Motors used car lot. They found a small side window in one car broken. ;[: ,'p, SHERIFF'S OFFICE It was reported that someone broke into Herbs Second Hand Store on Highway 101 over the weekend. David Thrumstrom, 13, and Mar- tin Willis, 13, were picked up and retraced to Willis's mother and step father. They had run away from home. Mrs. Squires at Belfair reported two boys took food and money from her home Saturday. It is be- lieved it was boys who had ran way from the Mission Creek outh camp. Dorothy Ilarper. Belfair, repor- ted that 10 to 15 mellons were ta- ken from a truck parked at ber home. This also was believed to be the work of the youth camp In-aways, A break-in at the Hamburger In and : Out was reported last week. James Wsyols, 16, and Robert Hibbert, 17, two of the youths who escaped from the Mission Creek Youth Camp were caught near the Tacoma Narrows Bridge, and retnrned to the camp. B-E DAY (Continued from page i) tendent of schools, introduced J. XV. Goodpaster. county superinten- dent of schools and Oscar Levin, Chamber of Commerce president, who welcomed the teachers to the event. Following a iuneheon at the Ev- ergreen School cafeteria at noon. the group was taken in six school busses to tout' part of the Simp- son operation on the water front. They went through Sawmill 3, the "pushbutton" mill and oh-. served the operation in wbieh logs are sawed into board utilizing ma- chinery to the greatest extent pos- sible. ,They also visited the dry kilns, b(filt recentiy to dry hemlock lum- ber. Also observed was the stack- ing of the lnmber witb spaces m between each board in preparation for nutting" it. into the kilns. They were told that additional dry kilns would be built and ad- ditional dry lumber storage space would be erected in areas ajoining the present operation. The touring groups walked through the vast building which will house the new veneer plant, obselwing the construction activi- ty in progress. When completed, the process from taking the logs from the bay through to storage in a huge warehouse area will all be in the new building. "It was a shattering blow to the people of Shelton and all of Wash- ington. The Seattle Times used a cartoon to describe the falling ot a mighty monarch of the forest. Stories, editorials and testimonials filled many columns for days. An era had come to an abrupt stop. "Some years later, in 1938, the former postmistress of Shelton, Miss Jessie Knight, wrote a letter to the Shelton city council, pro- posing the street in front of the post office be named Mark E. Reed Way. On July 6, 1939, the city council passed a motion approving this suggestion. Nothing more was done about it. "A FEW DAYS AGO I learn- ed the city at last is preparing signs to appropriately name the street after the man who is now remembered by the Mark E. Reed Scholarship Foundation, by the Mark l. Reed Chapter. Order ot DeMolay, and by the Mark E. Reed Memorial hospital in Mc- Cleary. The library, the high school, the general hospital, and this hall tn which we have met today (Memorial Hall) were his gifts to the community. But the biggest thing he gave was an in- spiration to blild for permanence, As long" as we retain that inspir- ation, no one will forget Mark E. Reed." HOUSEWIVES LEAGUE W L Shelton Union Service ...... 9 3 Jim Pauley Inc ................... 7 5 Ronnie's ................................ 7 5 Shelton Marine .................... 6 Evergreen Florists ............ 6 6 Hood Canal Marine .......... 5 7 B & W Marina .................. 4 8 Bali's Food Center .............. 4 8 20High.. game Virginia Dundas, High series--Ginger Olsoe 499. Split picks---Alice Kopperman, 3-9-10, Gladys Nelson 3-10 Ph, 426-8139 I You Should Know... O[i NTWI L L 0 U R The gravest problem which confronts the head of an American family is how to leave his dependents any sort of a safe minimum subsistence. High income taxes and low yields upon investments hereafter more or less preclude the ac- cumulation of dependable estates. The answer obviously is Life Insurance. elW NATIONAl.," SHELTON--=MASON COUNTY JOURNAE--Published in "Chrisfmasfown, U.KA.", SheKon, Washington TOP EQUESTRIANS-Molly,Taylor with her horse, Cavalette, who won high point honors in the older age division at Tumwater Saturday in the all-jun- ior horse show, and Darrell Williams on Tinkerbelle as winner of the 13-and-under age group high point honors. Darrell is receiving his trophy from Toni Mason Counly Junior Equeslrians Cleanup In Tumwater Events Mason County entries rode off with a heavy share of honors at the all-junior horse show featuring Performance Classes and Western games on the Capitol Riders Grounds at Tumwater Saturday. In the Performance Classes, Molly Taylor of Agate, riding Cav- aleKe, captured top thonors in Fitting and Showing, English Plea- sure, and Equitation Stock Saddle. A Skokomish Valley brother-sis- ter combination earned two high places in the 10-and-under group in Stock Saddle Equitation. Kurt Hunter was third and his sister Jayni, only five, riding her moth- er's gray Arabian mare, took fifth. Darrell Williams. on Tinkerbelle. won fifth in the same class in the 13-and-under. then came back af- ter the lunch break to earn high- point honors in his age group in the Western Games competition. Molly Tavlor won high point hon- ors for tlm older group to go along with her morning conquests. Trophies for the show were do- nated by Hank Morley's quarter- horse ranch and feed for the hors- es by Harvey's Feed Store of Olympia. Ribbons were donated by Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Correa. Mr. and Mrs Les Shelver. Dr, and Mrs. Doug Larson. Mr. and Mrs. James Taylor. tile Hunter Bros. Farms, I.tsap-Ma son Dairymen's As- sociation, and Mr. and Mrs. Red Rowe of Alderbrook Stables. Gate prizes ,ere won-by Carol Holmstroin (a brush), Bofinfe Ves- sey (a halterS, and Jim Brysoffa picket pin). Winners in the Zone Champion- ship Show will be announced in ne>:t week's etion. Fire Damages Home Saturday A fire of undetermined origin early Saturday morning did con- siderable damage to a house at Fourth and Poplar Streets on Cap- itol Hill. The home was owned by Mrs. Virdon Savage, but was not oc- cupied. Mrs. Savage has been liv- ing at the Shelton Valley Nursing Home. Her son. Charles, has been looking after the property. The Shelton Fire Department said damage was estimated at $2,- 000 to the house and $500 to the contents. The fire had engulfed much o the interior of the house when the fire department arrived. A neigh- bor reported the fire to the de- partment. Two fire trucks answered the call and brought the blaze under control: The fire occured shortly after 2 p.m. Saturday. Heirman of Olympia. Darrell has been invited to ride in the "Parade of.Champions" in Kirkland this weekend. GOLF CLUB CALENDAR WOMEN'S FALL TOURNEY NOW IN PROGRESS Virginia Bayley has moved far- thest along the path in the an- nual women's fall golf tom-nament at the Shelton Golf Club, reach- ing the quarterfinals after de- feating Dot Hillier last week. Both had advanced to that point through byes in earlier rounds from the original field of 11 en- tries. Nits Kimbel entered the second round by defeating Martha Cole, now meets Jean Yeager, who ad- vanced with a bye. Matches yet to be played paired Ruth Heuston against Frankie Wuench, the win- ner meeting Ann Cornea, who byed, and Helen Rice against Hel- en Brewer, winner to meet Joan McComb, who byed. SHELTON GIRLS tIOST ARTONDALE GOLFEMS Shelton wom2P']ayed host to their counterparts from Arton- WOMEN'S COSEVIERCIAL W I, Kelly Furniture .................. 9 3 Gott Oilerettes .................. 8 4 Bill's Shell Service .............. 8 4 Allyn Shell Service .............. 7 5 Richfield Oil ...................... 6 6 Darigold _____..............- ..... 4 8 Eells & Valley'"....___........... 4 8 Ming Tree Cafe .................. 2 10 High game Phyl Collins and Adair Neau each 189. High series -Phyl Collins 503. WOMEN'SCITY LEAGUE W Lumbermen's Mere .............. 4 Millo's Diner ...................... 3 Morgan Transfer .............. 3 Shelton Hotel ...................... 2 Polka Dot .......................... 2 Sunbeam Bread .................. 1 Drug Center ...................... 1 Hoodsport Lmnber .............. 0 High game--Evelyn Eliot 195. dale Golf Club of Gig Harbor last Thursday with Gert Batstone hav- ing low gross, Helen. Rice low net and Nits Kimbel second low net for the home forces. Dot Hillier was closest to the pin. In women's play last Tuesday Joan McComb had low net. 2 WEEKEND EVENTS FOR GOLF CLUB MEMBERS Two events which give both the social and the competitive aspects of Shelton Golf Club membership full sway are scheduled this week- end. Saturday night the Fall Festi- val dinner-dance features the so- cial end. A few tickets are still available, may be obtained at Me- Comb Business Service and Pan- torium Cleaners. Sunday a bit of both will be en- joyed during the season's second mixed two-ball foursome. Play starts at 3:30 with a potluck din- ner following the eonlpetition. SIMPSON ;OMEN W L Research .............................. 6 2 Accounting .......................... 6 2 Insulating Board .................. 6 2 Lumber .................................. 4 4 Engineering .......................... 4 4 Purchasing ............................ 3 5 Olympic Yywood ................ 3 5 Loggers ................................. 0 8 High game Betty Dean 210. High series-=.Betty Dean 505. MIXED FOURSOMES L V L 0 Timber Ducks .................. 71/.'_, 1) 1 Board Busters .................. 6 2 1 Odd tklz ............................ 5 3 2 What's Next ...................... 4% 3% 2 Pin Busters ...................... 3Jj 4/fi 3 Twisters ........................... 3 5 3 Strippers 1 6. 4 Knock Outs ...................... 1 7 High eries--.Evelyn Eliot 513, Split pickVera Lowe 5-8-10. MEN'S CITY LEAGUE W L Simpson Timber .................. 4 2 Frisken Oil .......................... 4 2 Shaub-Ellison ...................... 3 3 John's Richfield .................. 3 3 Prep'p's Rexall Store .......... 3 3 Beckwith Jewelry .............. 3 3 Wilson Company .............. 3 3 40& 8 .................................. 1 5 Iigh game A1 Ferrier 235. High series--Stan Ahlquist 585 RAYONIER RESEARCH W L Rayonettes ............................ 8 4 Maintenance ........................ 7 5 Silva Foxes .......................... 7 5 Wood Birds .......................... 7 5 Water Boys .......................... 7 5 Acetate Aces ....................... 6 6 Fourfowlers .......................... 3 9 Pin Curlers .......................... 3 9 High games---Marg Bacon 170 Rolls Halber 221. High serie-Marg Bacon 467 Gerry Hart 553. / Friday, Sept. 20 BUD PAULEY DODGE Invites you to come in and see the 1964 Cars onlhis 50th Anniversary of Dodge. Used Cars and Trucks also on Display '59 Interlmtional Pick-Up .................. $1295 long box, 4 speed, 6 ply. clean '57 Plymouth 4 dr. wagon ...................... =79:5 '57 Plymouth 4 dr. clean ........................ $695 '57 Buick 4 dr ......................................... $795 3 left over '63 Cars Dart Convertible Dart 880 4 door Dart Station Wagon PAULEY IIOTORS Front & Railroad 426-8183 i High games--Mack Elliott 225. Lorna Churchill 171. High series--- Clyde Landsaw 574. Lorna Churchill 440. 1.2:30 LEAGUE Cota Grill .............................. 7 1 Nell's Pharmacy ................ 4 4 Shelton Union Service ........ 3 5 Phil's Richfield .................... 2 6 High game Connie Cronquist 194. 47 High1. series Connie Cronquist Ham Hyatl, Early Day Shelton Ball Player, Passes In Spokane Early-day Mason County sports, fans learned with sorrow this week l of the death in Spokane Sunday l night of Ham Hyatt, who rose to fame as a major league baseball player after living and playing ball in Shelton. Hyatt played with the Shelton semi-pro club in the early 1900's. coming here from Hoquiam and leaving here for Vancouver. B.C.. where he began his professional career about 1910. His prodigious batting feats attracted major league attention and he was bought by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1913. During his first year with Pittsburgh, Hyatt batted .333 (those were the old "dead-ball" days of baseball} and helped the Pirates win the World Series. His major league career spanned seven years, during which he compiled a lifetime batting average of .267, and became famed as a pinch-bit- ter. He was a lefthanded batter, righthanded thrower 'who played outfield and first base as a pro, but third base outfield and a lit- tle pitching when he played with Shelton. Phil ami Paul Fredson are the only teammates still liv- ing here who played with Hyatt when he was with Shelton. Phil recalls one of his greatest batting feats with Shelton occm'- red in one of his last games, when he hit three home runs against Bremerton. After his playing days were ov- er he joined the Washington State Patrol and engaged in law en- forcement work for the rest of his life in one capacity or other, at one time serving as deputy sheriff in Grays Harbor county from 1927- 1929. He had lived in Spokane since that time. MILLER SECOND IN B,G, GO-KART RAGE Bad luck doCked  .... ,^,,_ entries but a third woun Up t the second place trophy in the Class B division of the semi-annual 100-mile Enduro goakart competl- tion at New Westminster. B.C. last weekend. John Miller. driving Ed John- son's kart. took the prize, cover- ing the 100 miles in one hour 27 minutes. But for 90 miles he. like all the rest of the field, trailed Roy "Wade. A broken sprocket put lhe Shel- toll youth out just wllen it seemed he had it sewed up. Ronnie Anderson was in the thick of it for 30 miles, but blew his molor and had to drop out. Eventual winner was Olympia's Don MeCzacken. Next semi-annual 100-miler at New YVestn]instcr will be next May. FRATERNAL LEAGUE Eagles Aerie ...................... 7 1 Moose Antlers ..................... 7 1 Bull Moose .......................... 5 3 Kiwanis Club ...................... 5 3 Fuller Constln]ction ......... 4 4 Shelton Hardware .............. ;: Rotary Club ........................ 1 Lions Club .......................... 0 8 High game- Larry .Lyle 213. High series Larry Lyle 548. MERCHANTS LEAGUE Prp's Rexall ...................... 5 3 Miller's .................................. 5 3 Old Mill .................................. 5 3 Bill's Shell Service .............. 5 3 Ralph's Serve-U .................. 5 3 Stewart's Foodliner .......... 4 4 Kimbel & Whitey's .............. 2 6 Olympic Plywood .............. 1 7 High game Bud Donaldson 224 High series a;lly Eigenman 586. S AV liiNi NB;I L O A N .1OO NiNiiNiiiNN o Do you know what business last year financed more than four hundred thousand homes . , . created more than seven hundred thousand job= . . , generated two and one-half billion dollars in home eqmpment sales . . . pid Americans three billion dollars in extra income? The answer -- the Savings and Loan Associations of America  now one hundred billion dollars strong! Yes, savings and loans throughout the nation are helping you and your neighbors build more personal security by making thrift profitable and safe . . by-ma-ki-n-g--h-irn-wn- ership possible for more families. This month, we are proud to join more than 6,300 savings and loan associations in celebrating the one-hundred-billion-dollar growth of this vital community business. Now is an excellent time for you to learn how personal security can best be won the savings, and loan way. Your Savings ,at Current Annum Rates EARN DIVIDEHDS AT 41/ Compomzded four times Annually Shelton Branch Thurston County Federal - nl Savings & Loan Associahon Home Office 5th 8= Capitol Way Olympia, Wash. Branch Office 313 Railroad Ave. Shelton, Wash Branch Office Market Square Lacey, Wash. Thursday, I g CLEAR i SALE." LAST YEAR'S AND USED FRIGIDAIRE APPLIANCES 1963 DELUXE FRIGIDAII{I DRYER (Model DD-631 5 DRYING CYCLES TURQUOISE COLOR AUTOMATIC DRYING cYCLE REGULAR 194.95 VALUE ............ NOW ONLY , ONE ONLY) 1963 Model WCDAS-1 Frigidair WASHER 2 WASHING SPEEDS  REGULAR $18500 ff 219.95 VALUE ............ NOW ONLY tONE ONLY) SCHOOL - USED FRIGIDAII REFRiGERAIOR ( MODEL FPI-13B-62) FROST FREE BOTTOM F REEZglq 13 CU. FT. CAPACITY SAVE OVER $200.00 ONLY ............................ t.a.g. SCHOOL USED FgI ELE(TRI( ,ROLL-AN-CLEAN oVEN 4 BURNER--DELUXE SAVE $100 $1 ONLY ............................ t.a.g. (ONE ONLY) NEW - UPRIGtIT FR1 UFD-10-63 FReEZeR (ONE ONLY) ii  8 CUBIC FOOT REFRiGE ( COMPLETELY REC LIKE NEW ........................................... (ONE ONLY) JUST SAY "CHARGE iT" AT LM ! SERVING SHELTON sINCE 1895 1st and PINN * ' 3 DIAL 426-439 Monday - Friday 8 a,m. till 5:30 Saturday 8 a.m. till 4:30 P''